Red Alert: Bill in General Assembly Would Expand Payday Lending Despite New Poll Showing Overwhelming Support for 36 Percent Rate Cap

Poll Shows 88 percent of Hoosier Voters Support a 36 percent Rate Cap; Three Quarters Would Vote For a Candidate Favoring the Cap

A new poll shows 88 percent of Hoosiers support a 36 percent rate cap on annual interest for payday loans, which currently carry up to 391 percent annual interest. Respondents also found payday loans to be harmful, expensive, and a financial burden to families.

The poll, conducted by Prosperity Indiana, Brightpoint, and Indiana Institute for Working Families in partnership with Bellwether Research, also found that 75 percent of Hoosiers would oppose seeing a payday loan store open in their neighborhoods, and 75 percent would be more likely to vote for a legislative candidate who favors lowering interest rates on payday loans to 36 percent.

Even so, Representative Burton (R-Greenwood), Chair of the Financial Institutions Committee, plans to give payday lenders a hearing on a bill that would not only expand payday lending, but also exempt a new set of subprime lenders from Indiana’s criminal loan sharking laws. The bill allows for increased rates and fees on a broader set of consumer loans.

As drafted, HB 1319 (Carbaugh, R-Fort Wayne):
·       Allows all consumer loans up to $54,600 to be subject to a 36 percent interest rate and increases fees like delinquency charges. Currently only loans of $2000 or less can charge 36 percent;
·       Triples the non-refundable prepaid finance charge lenders can tack on over and above this 36 percent rate - from $50 to $150 - and increases the number of times per year a lender can charge this fee to a borrower from two to three;
·       Exempts the non-refundable prepaid finance charge on installment loans from the current felony criminal loan sharking standard of 72 percent APR, allowing subprime loans to reach triple-digit APRs;
·       Protects the current two-week payday loan product at 391 percent APR;
·       Adds a new three-18 month installment loan product, called an “unsecured consumer loan,” exclusively for licensed payday lenders with the same high costs and debt trap features that characterize existing payday loans. A conservative application of language in the “unsecured consumer loan” chapter of the bill produces loans at around 200 percent APR. Depending on how fees and interest are applied, it could be even higher.

On the other side of the statehouse, SB 416 (Eckerty, R-Yorktown) contains some of the damaging elements of HB 1319. Meanwhile, SB 325 would cap payday loans at 36 percent. However, Senator Perfect (R-Lawrenceberg), the new chair of the Senate Insurance and Financial Institutions Committee, has not set a hearing date for that legislation. That bill is co-authored by three members of the Senate Insurance and Financial Institutions Committee: Senator Walker (R-Columbus), Senator Ruckleshaus (R-Indianapolis), and Senator Melton (D-Merillville).

“These high-cost loans have devastating consequences for borrowers and for community stability. With Hoosiers expressing overwhelming support for a rate cap and efforts to reign in payday lenders’ abusive practices, you have to wonder why we would ever consider legislation to expand these products and increase fees instead,” said Steve Hoffman, President and CEO of Brightpoint.

Capping loans at 36 percent interest is the most effective way to stop the cycle of high-cost debt intentionally created by payday lenders. It is the rate the U.S. Department of Defense secured to protect active duty military members and 15 other states have implemented caps of 36 percent or less to protect borrowers from usurious loans. It allows wide access to credit without creating an incentive for a lender to seek out distressed borrowers who are unable to repay. The results of this poll are conclusive. Indiana voters believe 36 percent is the fix to these high-cost debt traps.

Sign on here to support SB 325. Then, share this post on social media. 



For more information, see the Indiana Institute for Working Families’ explanation for why 36 percent is the fix for small loans in Indiana as well as a factsheet and policy brief on payday lending. See also While praising federal payday loan rule, Indiana advocates call for further action from state lawmakers.   


Contact:  Erin Macey, Policy Analyst, Indiana Institute for Working Families  | 317-638-4232

Kathleen Lara, Policy Director, Prosperity Indiana |  317-454-8536 
Saturday, January 13, 2018

Inside the Statehouse: Week 2

This week saw our first victories for working families, as SB11 (Eligibility for supplemental nutrition assistance) and SB142 (Maternal mortality review committee) passed unanimously out of committee. Next week committee hearings will consider a traffic fee amnesty for low-income drivers, reverse credit transfer, individual development accounts, and potentially short-term predatory loans.

Last week was the first official week in which the Senate began to file their bills. This week House bills were rolled out, however, bills in both houses are still being released, so we will be updating our tracked bills page as bills become available. 

LAWMAKERS PARTICIPATE IN POVERTY SIMULATION
On Tuesday January 12th the Institute, in partnership with the United Way of Central Indiana held a Poverty Simulation luncheon with committee members from both the House Committee on Family, Children and Human Affairs and Senate Committee on Family and Children Services. We would like to thank Chairmen Representative David Frizzell and Senator Ronald Grooms for supporting the simulation and encouraging committee members to attend.


The simulation which lawmakers participated in consisted of scenario participation. Lawmakers were each given a low-income family scenario and a three-month budget with which to work. Each of the scenarios involved complications faced by each family in which tough financial decisions about health care, childcare, transportation, food and other necessities had to be made in response to a crisis faced by each family. Crises included job loss, unavoidable medical issues, and other emergencies faced by low income families across the state. Each scenario situation was based on a real-life true story, a reality faced by real Hoosiers living at or below the poverty line. The lawmakers said they found the simulation to be eye opening and highly informative of the kinds of decisions and the effects of those decisions faced by low income Hoosiers every day. 

SB11 PASSES THE SENATE FAMILY AND CHILDRENS SERVICES COMMITTEE UNANIMOUSLY
On Thursday January 11th the Senate Family and Children Services Committee lead by Chairman Senator Ronald Groom heard SB 11. Senate Bill 11 authored by Senator Mike Bohacek, is a high priority bill on the Institute’s agenda. SB 11 will remove the lifetime ban from SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) placed upon people who have felony drug convictions.
Removing this life time ban is important for several reasons:
·         In 1996 the federal government placed a ban upon people who have felony drug convictions to address the war on drugs and welfare reform. States have the option of opting out of the ban. To date Indiana is 1 of only 4 states that have yet to remove the ban and provide much needed food assistance to an otherwise eligible population of Hoosiers.
·         Our own Policy Analyst, Amy Carter, testified in support of SB 11 citing a 2006 study which found that average income for a person who has reentered society from prison is about $11,000 in the first year. This is well below the nearly $18,500 dollar per year needed for self-sufficiency for a single adult in Indiana. Access to vital needs such as food are necessary for successful reentry and aiding people on the path to self-sufficiency.
·         Indiana currently faces many challenges with addiction and substance dependency. The current opioid epidemic is a prime example of the complexity of multifaceted issues involved in tackling addiction and recovery. Substance dependency has far reaching negative effects on the state’s workforce, economy, and the health and well-being of Hoosier families. As a result, support for the health and treatment of substance abuse has become a major focus of state health and workforce policy. Mark Fairchild, testifying on behalf of the Children’s Coalition of Indiana in support of SB11 addressed the importance of proper nutrition in recovery, identifying lack of nutrition as a contributing factor in relapse.
·         People should not continue to be punished or endure undue hardships long after the have completed sentencing. The lifetime ban from food assistance does just that, places undue hardships on people who have successfully completed their sentences. Glen Tebbe, from the Indiana Catholic Conference, testified that “people who have paid their debt and are attempting to rectify past mistakes should be given support.”
·         The SNAP ban has a direct effect on the ability to house Indiana’s homeless population. Allen Witchey from the Coalition for Homeless Intervention and Prevention (CHIP) testified that the ban directly effects their ability to house people. Many people who are homeless suffer from substance abuse and have past drug convictions. People must be fed before they can be housed, as a result portions of the housing budget must be redirected to provide food, which limits available housing funds. Removing the ban would allow for organizations like CHIP to spend more of their budget on housing.

In addition to those mentioned above, others testifying in support of SB 11 included: Emily Bryant, (Executive Director, Feeding Indiana’s Hungry), Amanda Briles (Director of Quality Assurance, The Villages-Indiana), Greg Keesling (Recycle Force), Tim Brown (Indy Chamber), Betsy Delgado (Vice President of Mission and Education Initiatives, Goodwill of Central Southern Indiana), Sheryl Ash (South Bend, IN), Christina Hase (citizen), Danielle Patterson (Government Relations Director, American Heart Association, Allen Sutherland (Shepard Community Center), and Debbie Driskell (Indiana Township Association). 
The bill passed out of the Senate Family and Children’s Services Committee with a 7 to 0 vote and an approved amendment. Senator Mike Bohacek, author of SB 11 added an amendment which would revoke SNAP benefits from an individual who violates their terms and conditions of probation or parole. 
SB 11 will now head to the senate floor for a second reading.

BILLS HEARD IN COMMITTEES THIS WEEK:
Many bills Institute is following this session were heard in various committees throughout the week. Of the bills which had committee hearings SB 11: Eligibility for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance and SB 142: Maternal Mortality Review Committee are bills in which the Institute have decided are high priority bills to watch in the 2018 General Assembly. As the session progresses, we will add our position to bills as appropriate. Below you can read more about each bill heard and what happened in the different committees.  


HB1023
ANNEXATION REMONSTRANCE WAIVERS (BACON R) Allows (rather than requires) a sewage works contract to include a release of the property owner's right of remonstrance to an annexation of the property served by the sewage works. Removes a provision providing that a person waives the person's remonstrance rights upon connecting to the sewage works.

Current Status:   
1/11/2018 - House Local Government, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/3/2018 - added as coauthor Representative Zent
1/3/2018 - Referred to House Local Government
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Ronald Bacon

State Bill Page:   

HB1047
EDUCATION BENEFITS FOR VETERANS (WESCO T) Excludes from the determination of financial eligibility for need based financial aid certain benefits received by veteran students. Provides for state educational institution students who are members of the Indiana National Guard, the reserves, or armed forces who are on active duty or are called to active duty during an academic term to receive: (1) a tuition refund or credit; or (2) reenrollment in courses not completed due to active duty status.

Current Status:   
1/16/2018 - House Bills on Second Reading

All Bill Status:   
1/10/2018 - Committee Report amend do pass, adopted
1/9/2018 - DO PASS AMEND Yeas: 10; Nays: 0
1/9/2018 - House Veterans Affairs and Public Safety, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/3/2018 - added as coauthor Representative Frye
1/3/2018 - Referred to House Veterans Affairs and Public Safety
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Timothy Wesco

State Bill Page:   

HB1051
SUNDAY SALES OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES FOR CARRYOUT (SMALTZ B) Allows the following to sell alcoholic beverages for carryout on Sunday from noon until 8 p.m.: (1) A package liquor store, grocery store, convenience store, or drug store. (2) A restaurant that satisfies the requirements to sell carryout. (The introduced version of this bill was prepared by the alcohol code revision commission.)

Current Status:   
1/10/2018 - House Public Policy, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/8/2018 - added as coauthors Representatives GiaQuinta and Ober
1/3/2018 - Referred to House Public Policy
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Ben Smaltz

State Bill Page:   

HB1056
INNKEEPERS' TAXES (OBER D) Provides that a member appointed to a convention and tourism commission under the uniform innkeeper's tax statute who is required to be: (1) engaged in a convention, visitor, or tourism business; or (2) involved in or promoting conventions, visitors, or tourism; need not be a resident of the county if the member is an owner or an executive level employee of a convention, visitor, or tourism business that is located within the county. Provides that such a member must be a resident of Indiana. Repeals the requirement in the uniform innkeeper's tax statute that no more than a simple majority of the members of a convention and tourism commission may be affiliated with the same political party. Amends the uniform innkeeper's tax statute to include the term "tourist camps and overnight camping facilities" for purposes of innkeeper's tax collection. Requires the department of state revenue (department) to prescribe a standard return form to be used with remittance of the innkeeper's tax. Requires the department to provide each commission with summary data of the amount of the innkeeper's tax disbursed to the county. Provides that, in the case of a county that has adopted an ordinance requiring the payment of the innkeeper's tax to the county treasurer instead of the department: (1) the county treasurer is required to annually report to the department the amount of innkeeper's tax collected in the county in the preceding year; and (2) the department is required to provide summary data of the total amount of the county's innkeeper's tax collected in the preceding year to the commission established for that county.

Current Status:   
1/11/2018 - House Ways and Means, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/3/2018 - Referred to House Ways and Means
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Coauthored by Representative GiaQuinta
1/3/2018 - Authored By David Ober

State Bill Page:   

HB1074
VARIOUS HIGHER EDUCATION MATTERS (SULLIVAN H) Makes changes regarding the: (1) conditions required to qualify for the renewal of a twenty-first century scholars program scholarship; and (2) award amounts to twenty-first century scholars program scholarship applicants who attend a private, approved postsecondary educational institution. Makes the following changes concerning the primary care shortage area scholarship: (1) Amends the practice requirements to receive a scholarship. (2) Amends the repayment requirements for noncompliance with a primary care practice agreement. (3) Allows the commission for higher education (commission) to impose and collect interest on unpaid repayment amounts. (4) Provides that, if the commission and a recipient of a scholarship enter into a new written agreement that complies with the primary care shortage area scholarship provisions, the commission and recipient may terminate an agreement entered into or renewed before July 1, 2018. Requires the chairperson of the commission to appoint a: (1) seven member student member nominating committee; and (2) seven member faculty member nominating committee. (Current law requires the chairperson to appoint a ten member nominating committee of five student members and five faculty members.) Requires the commission to: (1) study and make recommendations regarding the expansion of the high value workforce ready credit-bearing grant to recent high school graduates; and (2) prepare and submit, not later than November 1, 2018, a report regarding the recommendations to the budget agency and legislative council. Modifies the procedures that a state educational institution must use to dispose of real estate (including any real estate acquired by gift, bequest, or devise). Provides that an applicant who: (1) does not maintain satisfactory academic progress as required to be eligible for a high value workforce ready credit-bearing grant; but (2) meets other certain conditions; is still eligible for the grant. Repeals certain statutes concerning: (1) the disposition of gifts, bequests, and devises of real estate to state educational institutions; and (2) matters that pertain to the closing process in the disposition of real estate by a state educational institution. Makes conforming amendments. Removes an expired provision.

Current Status:   
1/16/2018 - House Bills on Second Reading

All Bill Status:   
1/10/2018 - House Bills on Second Reading
1/9/2018 - Committee Report amend do pass, adopted
1/9/2018 - DO PASS AMEND Yeas: 13; Nays: 0
1/9/2018 - House Education, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/3/2018 - Referred to House Education
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Coauthored by Representatives Austin, May and Schaibley
1/3/2018 - Authored By Holli Sullivan

State Bill Page:   

HB1104
PROPERTY TAX MATTERS (LEONARD D) Specifies the deadlines for county auditors to submit property tax settlement and distribution information to the department of local government finance (DLGF). Repeals the electronic digital signature act. Amends the definition of "owner" (for purposes of the property tax statutes) to delete the provision specifying that an owner of tangible property includes the holder of a tenancy for a term of years. Deletes obsolete language in the statutes exempting certain business personal property with an acquisition cost of less than $20,000. Specifies that a taxpayer eligible for such an exemption must include on the taxpayer's personal property tax return: (1) information concerning whether the taxpayer's business personal property within the county is in one location or multiple locations; and (2) an address for the location of the property. Provides that if a local service fee is imposed on a taxpayer claiming such an exemption, the county shall include the local service fee on a property tax bill associated with the tax district in which the majority value of the taxpayer's business personal property within the county is located. Provides that a taxpayer may be charged only one local service fee per county. Specifies that if a penalty is imposed on a taxpayer for failing to declare on the taxpayer's tax return that the taxpayer is entitled to the exemption for business personal property with an acquisition cost of less than $20,000, the county shall include the penalty on a property tax bill associated with the tax district in which the majority value of the taxpayer's business personal property within the county is located. Provides that the appropriate county officer designated by the county executive (rather than the assessor, under current law) is responsible for: (1) maintaining data files of the geographic information system characteristics of each parcel in the county as of each assessment date; and (2) submitting those files to the geographic information office of the office of technology. Provides that if an assessing official determines that the owner of a parcel of property is unable to use the property to the owner's full and complete benefit because: (1) the parcel is completely surrounded by parcels owned by other owners; and (2) the owner does not possess and cannot obtain an easement granting ingress or egress into the property or the owner is otherwise incapable of having sufficient ingress or egress to the property; the assessing official shall apply an influence factor for limited access as prescribed in the rules of the DLGF. Requires that the budget notice that political subdivisions must publish on the DLGF's computer gateway must also include information concerning the percentage change between the current and proposed tax levies of each fund. Requires county auditors to submit data on deductions applicable to the current tax year to the homestead property data base on or before March 15 of each year, in a manner prescribed by the DLGF. Repeals the statute providing for a county board of tax adjustment. Repeals provisions related to the county board of tax adjustment and the local budgeting process. Specifies that a political subdivision shall file the budget adopted by the political subdivision with the county auditor and the DLGF not later than two days after the budget is adopted. Authorizes the DLGF to adopt rules for procedures related to local government budgeting. Specifies that the adoption, amendment, or repeal of such a rule by the DLGF may not take effect before March 1 or after July 31 of a particular year. Specifies: (1) that rules adopted by the DLGF for the appraisal of real property may not apply to any appraisal contemporaneously being conducted under a county's reassessment plan; and (2) that rules adopted by the DLGF may first apply to the reassessment phase beginning in the following calendar year under a county's reassessment plan. Specifies that for purposes of attributing the amount of a property tax deduction or exemption to the gross assessed value of a property: (1) a deduction or exemption that is specific to an improvement shall be applied only to the assessed value allocation pertaining to that improvement; and (2) to the extent that a deduction or exemption is not specific to an improvement; the deduction or exemption shall be applied in the order that will maximize the benefit of the deduction or exemption to the taxpayer. Provides a property tax exemption for property owned by a continuing care retirement community when all or a part of the property does not otherwise qualify for a property tax exemption. Specifies that, in order to qualify for the exemption, the owner of the community must: (1) limit admission to senior citizens and their spouses; (2) be a nonprofit organization; (3) have an obligation to give senior citizens who are residents of the community priority, should the need arise, to be moved to a facility within the community that provides higher levels of care; and (4) have a policy of providing assistance to senior citizens who are residents of the community who become unable to make their payment obligation. Specifies that the base assessed value for tax increment financing purposes includes the net residential assessed value within the allocation area, as finally determined for the current assessment date. Makes technical corrections.

Current Status:   
1/11/2018 - House Ways and Means, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/4/2018 - Referred to House Ways and Means
1/4/2018 - First Reading
1/4/2018 - Authored By Daniel Leonard

State Bill Page:   

SB1
SUNDAY CARRYOUT SALES (ALTING R) Allows the following to sell alcoholic beverages for carryout on Sunday from noon until 8 p.m.: (1) A package liquor store, grocery store, convenience store, or drug store. (2) A restaurant that satisfies the requirements to sell carryout. (The introduced version of this bill was prepared by the alcohol code revision commission.)

Current Status:   
1/16/2018 - Senate Bills on Second Reading

All Bill Status:   
1/11/2018 - Committee Report do pass, adopted
1/10/2018 - Senate Public Policy, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Public Policy
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Ron Alting

State Bill Page:   

SB4
DUTIES OF CORRECTIONS AND CRIMINAL CODE INTERIM STUDY COMMITTEE (BRAY R) Provides that the interim study committee on corrections and criminal code shall review current trends with respect to criminal behavior, sentencing, incarceration, and treatment and may: (1) identify particular needs of the criminal justice system that can be addressed by legislation; and (2) prepare legislation to address the particular needs found by the committee. (The introduced version of this bill was prepared by the interim study committee on corrections and criminal code.)

Current Status:   
1/16/2018 - Senate Bills on Third Reading

All Bill Status:   
1/11/2018 - added as second author Senator Young M
1/11/2018 - Second reading ordered engrossed
1/11/2018 - Senate Bills on Second Reading
1/9/2018 - Committee Report do pass, adopted
1/9/2018 - DO PASS Yeas: 6; Nays: 1
1/9/2018 - Senate Corrections and Criminal Law, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Corrections and Criminal Law
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Rodric Bray

State Bill Page:   

SB11
ELIGIBILITY FOR SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE (BOHACEK M) Removes the 12 month limitation on receipt by certain individuals of supplemental nutrition assistance program (SNAP) benefits. Specifies that, beginning January 1, 2019, Indiana elects to opt out of the federal law prohibiting individuals convicted of certain drug offenses from receiving SNAP assistance if the individual meets specified conditions.

Current Status:   
1/11/2018 - DO PASS AMEND Yeas: 7; Nays: 0

All Bill Status:   
1/11/2018 - Senate Family and Children Services, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/10/2018 - added as coauthor Senator Niezgodski
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Family and Children Services
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Mike Bohacek

State Bill Page:   

SB62
HOSPICES AND MEDICAID (BECKER V) Requires the office of Medicaid policy and planning (office) to move a recipient who participates in the Medicaid risk based managed care program to the Medicaid fee for service program if the recipient is approved to receive hospice services without losing Medicaid coverage. Requires the office to reimburse the hospice provider through the fee for service program. Specifies that the Medicaid recipient remains in the fee for service Medicaid program through the recipient's Medicaid eligibility.

Current Status:   
1/10/2018 - Senate Health and Provider Services, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Health and Provider Services
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Vaneta Becker

State Bill Page:   

SB79
TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES (TANF) ELIGIBILITY (LANANE T) Sets the income eligibility requirements for the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program at not more than 50% of the federal income poverty level. Requires the division of family resources to amend the state TANF plan or take any other action necessary to implement the income requirements. Increases certain payment amounts under the TANF program and requires the payments to be annually adjusted using the Social Security cost of living adjustment rate.

Current Status:   
1/10/2018 - added as author Senator Stoops

All Bill Status:   
1/10/2018 - removed as author Senator Lanane
1/10/2018 - Committee Report amend do pass adopted; reassigned to Committee on Tax and Fiscal Policy
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Rules and Legislative Procedure
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Timothy Lanane

State Bill Page:   

SB129
FINAL DISPOSITION OF INDIGENT DECEDENT (BUCK J) Transfers the township trustee's responsibility for the final disposition of an indigent decedent to the county coroner. Makes conforming changes.

Current Status:   
1/10/2018 - Senate Local Government, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Local Government
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By James Buck

State Bill Page:   

SB142
MATERNAL MORTALITY REVIEW COMMITTEE (LEISING J) Requires the state department of health (state department) to establish a statewide maternal mortality review committee (committee) and sets forth membership and duties of the committee. Specifies confidentiality of records reviewed by the committee. Requires a health care provider or health care facility that has a patient who dies of a maternal mortality to report the death to the committee and sets forth immunity provisions for the provider or facility. Allows the committee to review maternal morbidity cases. Specifies records to which the committee may have access. Requires the committee to submit a report to the state department before July 1 of each year concerning the committee's reviews and requires the state department to post the report on the state department's Internet web site and make the report available for public inspection. Provides civil and criminal immunity to committee members in discussing confidential matters before the committee.

Current Status:   
1/16/2018 - Senate Bills on Second Reading

All Bill Status:   
1/11/2018 - Committee Report amend do pass, adopted
1/10/2018 - DO PASS AMEND Yeas: 10; Nays: 0
1/10/2018 - Senate Health and Provider Services, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/9/2018 - added as third author Senator Becker
1/9/2018 - added as second author Senator Charbonneau
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Health and Provider Services
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Jean Leising

State Bill Page:   

SB172
COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM (RAATZ J) Establishes the next level computer science grant program (program) and the next level computer science fund (fund) to award grants, after June 30, 2019, to eligible entities to implement teacher professional development programs for training in teaching computer science. Requires the state board of education to: (1) administer the program and fund; and (2) develop guidelines to award grants from the fund to eligible entities. Requires (beginning July 1, 2021) each public school, including a charter school, to offer a computer science course as a one semester elective course in its curriculum at least once each school year to high school students. Requires (beginning July 1, 2021) each public school, including a charter school, to include computer science in the public school's curriculum for students in kindergarten through grade 12. Makes conforming changes. Makes a continuing appropriation.

Current Status:   
1/17/2018 - Senate Education and Career Development, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/10/2018 - Senate Education and Career Development, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/8/2018 - added as second author Senator Kruse
1/8/2018 - Referred to Senate Education and Career Development
1/8/2018 - First Reading
1/8/2018 - Authored By Jeff Raatz

State Bill Page:   

SB189
K-12 FUNDING (MISHLER R) Permits the budget agency to transfer from the state tuition reserve account to the state general fund the amount necessary to offset a reduction in basic tuition support, special education grants, or career and technical education grants as a result of actual enrollment counts exceeding the enrollment projection estimates. Limits the transfer to $25,000,000 in a state fiscal year.

Current Status:   
1/11/2018 - DO PASS AMEND Yeas: 12; Nays: 0

All Bill Status:   
1/11/2018 - Senate Appropriations, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Appropriations
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By Ryan Mishler

State Bill Page:   

SB191
TOWNSHIP CEMETERY OWNERSHIP AND MAINTENANCE (BUCK J) Transfers from townships to counties the current provisions concerning cemetery establishment, ownership, and maintenance. Requires townships to transfer to the county in which the township is located cemetery related property and responsibilities before January 1, 2019.

Current Status:   
1/10/2018 - Senate Local Government, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)

All Bill Status:   
1/3/2018 - Referred to Senate Local Government
1/3/2018 - First Reading
1/3/2018 - Authored By James Buck

State Bill Page:   

SB301
CRIMINAL HISTORY CHECKS FOR HOME HEALTH WORKERS (RAATZ J) Provides that an expanded criminal history check may be used instead of certain background checks and criminal history checks for home health care workers. Prohibits an expanded criminal history check to include certain criminal history information.

Current Status:   
1/11/2018 - DO PASS Yeas: 6; Nays: 0

All Bill Status:   
1/11/2018 - Senate Commerce and Technology, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/4/2018 - Referred to Senate Commerce and Technology
1/4/2018 - First Reading
1/4/2018 - Authored By Jeff Raatz

State Bill Page:   

SB363
FSSA MATTERS (CHARBONNEAU E) Corrects outdated references to the "division of aging and rehabilitative services" to refer instead to the "division of disability and rehabilitative services". Removes references to home care services from the long term care ombudsman program. Removes the requirement that the long term care ombudsman (ombudsman) report the findings of the long term care ombudsman office (office) to the complainant. Allows the office to disclose records, documents, and findings of an investigated case to certain individuals with the informed consent of the resident of the long term care facility or the resident's legal guardian. Specifies the manner in which consent can be given by a resident. Specifies information to which the ombudsman shall be given access by a long term care facility. Changes the persons that must be provided with the ombudsman's annual report. Requires the state to provide independent legal counsel to the ombudsman for specified matters. Specifies grievances and complaints that must be addressed by the office. Repeals language concerning: (1) the admission and placement requirements concerning Evansville State Psychiatric Treatment Center; (2) state institution wage agreements; and (3) a statistical report requirement concerning state institutions.

Current Status:   
1/16/2018 - Senate Bills on Second Reading

All Bill Status:   
1/11/2018 - Committee Report amend do pass, adopted
1/10/2018 - DO PASS AMEND Yeas: 11; Nays: 0
1/10/2018 - Senate Health and Provider Services, (Bill Scheduled for Hearing)
1/4/2018 - Referred to Senate Health and Provider Services
1/4/2018 - First Reading
1/4/2018 - Authored By Ed Charbonneau

State Bill Page:   

BILLS HEARD IN COMMITTEES THIS WEEK:
Click the Committee title to watch live hearing

Tuesday, January 16, 2018
Tue., Jan. 16, 2018, 8:30 AM, Rm. 156-A
Rep. VanNatter: 317-234-9499
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE. (LEONARD D) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning labor and safety. 
PROFESSIONAL LICENSING AGENCY MATTERS. (ZENT D) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning professions and occupations. 
Tue., Jan. 16, 2018, 8:30 AM, Rm. 156-D
Rep. Gutwein: 317-232-9509
AGENCY REPORTING REQUIREMENTS. (GUTWEIN D) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning state offices and administration. 
Wednesday, January 17, 2018
Wed., Jan. 17, 2018, 9:00 AM, Rm. 431
Sen. Charbonneau: 317-232-9494
PERINATAL LEVELS OF CARE DESIGNATION CERTIFICATION. (CHARBONNEAU E) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning health. 

SR6**
URGING SUPPORT OF CHIP RE-AUTHORIZATION. (BREAUX J)  
Wed., Jan. 17, 2018, 9:00 AM, Rm. 130
CHILD SUPPORT. (BRAY R) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning family law and juvenile law. 
Wed., Jan. 17, 2018, 10:00 AM, Rm. 233
Sen. Boots: 317-234-9054
REPORTING ON WORKER MISCLASSIFICATION. (NIEZGODSKI D) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning labor and safety. 
WORKER'S COMPENSATION. (FORD J) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning labor and safety. 
Wed., Jan. 17, 2018, 1:30 PM, Rm. 156-C

Rep. Washburne: 317-232-9863
TRAFFIC AMNESTY PROGRAM. (SHACKLEFORD R) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning courts and court officers. 
Wed., Jan. 17, 2018, 1:30 PM, Rm. 156-B
Rep. Ober: 317-232-9643
HIGH SPEED INTERNET SERVICE. (OBER D) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning utilities. 
Report(s): My Tracked Bills
Wed., Jan. 17, 2018, 1:30 PM, Rm. 130
Sen. Kruse: 317-233-0930
*NOTE: Committee will adjourn by 6:00 p.m.*
REAL WORLD CAREER READINESS PROGRAM. (RUCKELSHAUS J) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning education. 
COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM. (RAATZ J) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning education and to make an appropriation. 
Wed., Jan. 17, 2018, 1:30 PM, Rm. 431
Sen. Buck: 317-232-9466
COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTERS. (BOOTS P) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning taxation. 
Thursday, January 18, 2018
Thu., Jan. 18, 2018, 9:00 AM, Rm. 431
Sen. Mishler: 317-232-9814
INCOME TAX CREDIT FOR K-12 EDUCATION DONATIONS. (MELTON E) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning taxation. 
INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT ACCOUNTS. (DORIOT B) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning state and local administration. 
Thu., Jan. 18, 2018, 9:30 AM, Senate Chamber
Sen. Grooms: 317-234-9425
CHILD CARE. (HOLDMAN T) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning human services. 
ACCESS TO FOOD PROGRAM. (RUCKELSHAUS J) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning human services. 
Thu., Jan. 18, 2018, 10:00 AM, Rm. 125
Sen. Perfect: 317-232-9541
SMALL LOANS. (PERFECT C) A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning financial institutions. 
Friday, January 12, 2018

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